What is the
Cranley Road
Area?
The Cranky Road Area lies to the east of Guildford.
It is
bounded by Cross Lanes in the West, Epsom Road in the South,
Boxgrove Road in the East and the "New Railway Line 1885" in
the North. It was originally part of Stoke next Guildford. In 1892
William Hillier, 4th Earl of Onslow, returned from New Zealand
and
began

to

develop

the

area

selling

the

land

for

large

out

of
town
villas.
Cranley
Road,

named

after

his

father

Thomas

Cranley

Onslow,
and
Pit

Farm

Road

were

created

to

provide

access

to

the

farms
(Watford and Pit Farm) from Cross Lanes in the west and Epsom
Road in the south. The area began to take shape with Cranky Road
extending
to

Pit

Farm

Road,

and

Aldersey,

Maori

and

Hillier
Roads being added to join Cranky Road to Epsom Road.
The 1873 Ordnance Survey slows only London Road, Epsom
Road, Cross Lanes and Boxgrove Road. By the 1896 Survey
Cranky and Pit Farm Road, originally called Pitt Paris Road, had
been added.
Pit Farm
Prior to the coming of the railway (the Guildford to London via
Woking
line

opened

in

1845)

the

area

was

open

farmland

with
some extraction of chalk from pits including Pit Farm and one in
Meads
Road.

Pit

Farm

Road

was

the

fast

connecting

mad

to

be
developed,
and

Pit

Farm

Cottage,

built

between

1820

and

1850
Cross Lanes
Cross
Lanes

marks

the

western

boundary

of

the

area

and

also

the
boundary between Christchurch and Holy Trinity Wards. It is one
of Guildford's oldest historical landmarks referred to in 1205 when
King John sold the Manor of Stoke next Guildford to the Bishop of
London.
It

remains

as

an

ancient

track

formed

perhaps

by

the
villagers
of

Stoke

on

the

way

to

their

own

manorial

courts

being
held at Warren Farm Part of Cross Lanes has survived as a "Green
Lane",
running

south

between

steep

banks

from

Cranley

Road,
crossing Epsom Road, and finishing at Warren Road, a total of 600m
Maori Road - how come?
Maori Road was the next to be developed.
It was named to
celebrate the Earl of Onslow's Maori connections.
He was Gov-
ernor of New Zealand from 1889 to 1892 during which time a vol-
canic eruption destroyed the Maori village of Te Wairva. The Earl
of Onslow purchased the Meeting House, one of the few buildings
to survive, which was shipped home and rebuilt in Clandon Park.
The Victorian Villas were all individual in design but shared many
common architectural features. They were substantial three storey
buildings set in large gardens and screened by shrubs and large
trees. The built form tapers from the ground to the roof with the
third floor built into the roof space. The walls are
predominately of local orange brick,
made more interesting by the use
of brick patterns, brick banding,
timber frames, tile cladding and
stucco. Many of the villas have
extravagant design features such
as turrets and stained glass and
ornate porches such as the one
illustrated here. The first part of
Cranley Road and Maori Road
were lined with trees to create a
leafy suburb.
A recent view of Cranky Road
------------------------------------------------